On March 18 Beata Bruggeman-Sekowska, president of EIOCO,  was interviewed by Polish news broadcasting internationally. She elaborated on the vision, purpose and the activities of our Institute. She explained that the knowledge about communism is often not correct in western Europe and that various stereotypes are perpetuated which shed the wrong light on this issue. […]

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    By Patrick van Schie   On March 5, 1946, Winston Churchill gave a speech  in Fulton, a city in Missouri, USA. The British war leader, Prime Minister until more than six months earlier, received an honorary doctorate from Westminster College in Fulton. He began his speech in a Churchillian way by saying that […]

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Disclosures by an Experience Expert in 1946-47: Victor Kravchenko’s I Chose Freedom   By Patrick van Schie   In April 1944, a senior official from the Soviet Union’s “trade delegation” defected to the United States. Victor Kravchenko, an engineer, was tasked with Lend Lease deliveries during World War II to the Soviet Union – that […]

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By Patrick van Schie On February 22, 1946, a telegram arrived from Moscow at the US State Department. The author, the second man at the US embassy, apologized in advance for using the telegraphic channel. The telegram was indeed unusually long: 17 sheets of paper typed out. It would also become unusually influential. The “Long […]

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On Wednesday, 13 January, at 9.55 a.m., while commemorating the 30th anniversary of the defence of the restored independence of Lithuania, Lithuanian Seimas kindly invites you to watch a video recording of the celebration of the Day of the Defenders of Freedom and the Freedom Prize awarding ceremony.   During the broadcast from the Seimas […]

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On the 13th of January victims of the Soviet military aggression of 1991 are commemorated. The candle, as symbol of the memory, today is lit across Lithuania and by the Lithuanian communities abroad. On 13 January 1991 armoured Soviet forces drove through peaceful crowd which gathered to protect the symbol of Lithuania’s independence – the […]

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Review of: Raymond Aron, The Opium of the Intellectuals (1st publication in French, 1955) Patrick van Schie   Nowhere in Western Europe have intellectuals been so fascinated by communism and the Soviet Union as in France. It was therefore appropriate that 65 years ago – in 1955, in the midst of the Cold War – […]

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Beata Bruggeman-Sękowska   On September 17 about 1 million troops of the Red Army crossed the eastern borders of Poland starting the red invasion of Poland. It was sixteen days after Nazi Germany invaded Poland from the west. The invasion ended on 6 October 1939 with the two-way division and annexation of the entire Second […]

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Patrick van Schie   Eighty years ago, at the end of 1940, Darkness at noon was published, translated from German. The writer, Arthur Koestler, was an old communist who had lost his illusions due to the Great Terror (1936-1938) in the Soviet Union. He wrote this off between 1938 and 1940, in a novel in […]

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Beata Bruggeman-Sekowska   When the Polish government under Edward Gierek introduced new food price increases in the summer of 1980 and Poland faced big international debt and shortages of supplies, a wave of labor unrest was stirred in the country. In July a series of strikes started in Lublin and on 14 August 1980 a […]

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